Tag Archives: Gourmet

Glycemic Index Recipes For the Healthy Gourmet

The glycemic index chart is a qualitative measure of a given food’s immediacy of impact upon blood sugar levels. The GI chart ranges from 1 to 100, and the lower a food’s score translates to less impact upon blood sugar levels. Foods which score high on the chart conversely cause rapid spikes in blood sucrose levels. Experts increasingly agree that overall health and energy is facilitated by sticking with foods with a low score. The good news is that there are an abundance of good recipes which allow for both health and taste.

The volatility which ensues in blood sugar levels after consuming foods high on the index causes several adverse effects. For a diabetic these consequences can be quite severe, and for others they can range from feelings of lethargy to increased feelings of hunger even shortly after finishing a full meal. Foods which score under 55 are considered low on the table. On the other end, foods which come in over 70 are considered high. Those in between are moderate.

When there is no alternative to a high GI ingredient there are tricks to dilute its impact. By combining proteins with high index foods one can reduce the full effect which would be felt should the high index food be eaten on its own. Good recipes take advantage of this phenomenon. One can maintain a healthy lifestyle while eating appetizing meals including dishes like this one:

Ingredients

(Serves 2)

3.5 oz pasta twirls
One and a half sticks of chopped celery
7 oz of drained borlotti beans
7 oz of canned tomatoes
1/3 cup of red wine
Half a vegetable stock cube
A few black olives
Pinch of dried herbs
Pinch of salt

Cooking Instructions

Place the pasta in an oven safe dish. Add the beans, olives, celery, tomatoes, stock cube, salt and herbs. Stir in the wine. Add water until the pasta is just covered.

Cover with aluminum foil and bake in a 375 degree oven for a half hour. Remove and stir. Place back in oven and cook for an additional 20 minutes removing the foil towards the end to allow for a nice crust to form on top.

And for dessert…..

Honey Mango Mousse

Ingredients

4 peeled and diced mangoes
2 bananas
400 grams low fat yogurt
4 teaspoons of honey
12 ice cubes
2 teaspoons vanilla

This low GI dessert is easily prepared by blending all the above ingredients and refrigerating for a few hours. Simply spoon into cups and serve.

One can see that these recipes are not lacking in appeal. Using a diet friendly and GI chart compliant cookbook allows you to control weight, increase energy, and still eat like a worldly gourmet.

Doug Dearing writes about glycemic index recipes at http://glycemicindexfoodlists.com

Principles of a Chinese Gourmet

An introduction to the fine art and science of creating perfection out of simple ingredients.

Among devotees of gastronomy who have had the privilege, of sampling the great national cuisines of the world, the Chinese cuisine is rated No. 1 quite as often as the French. It has a purity and refinement that transcend mere cleverness, a beautiful simplicity that marks the truly gourmet. Like the French, it is based upon sensitivity to the inherent nature of the foodstuff being prepared. Chinese awareness and respect for intrinsic taste and texture have produced a highly sophisticated body of practices and seasoning.

There are cookery books that provide recipes for Chinese food. But recipes are dry reading at best. As cookery is an art, one can hardly learn much from recipes without an explanation of the principles that underlie the cuisine that created them. The principles of Chinese cooking have been developed partly from long experience and partly by accident through many centuries. They are applicable not only to Chinese food but to good cooking in general, a science as well as an art.

First, the Chinese believe in nature. According to their interpretation, everything that grows on earth and is edible can be delicious when properly prepared, and so is intended by nature to be eaten by man. The Chinese explored the kingdom of vegetables and herbs and living creatures and so discovered a number of foods, undreamed of by the Westerner, that are both appetizing and beneficial to health. They are used when freshly gathered from field or forest or sea, and again after they have been preserved by pickling or drying in the sun. Thanks to these means of preservation, their supply is assured for all seasons.

As an example, the Chinese discovered the virtues of the soybean, and methods of growing bean sprouts indoors and making bean curds throughout the year.These ingredients are truly a blessing to the Chinese and a just reward for a long, patient search. They are appetizing, nutritious, and because economical to produce, accessible to all. When properly prepared, they appeal equally to the palate of prince or peasant. Such widespread appeal is typical of Chinese cooking.

Most Chinese dishes include some vegetables. The net effect is to enhance the taste of the main ingredient (meat or seafood) and at the same time give simple vegetables the benefit of pleasing flavor from the meat. The combination makes a delicious dish, easy to digest and healthful. Of course, Western cuisines use vegetables, too, but they are generally cooked and eaten separately from the meat. The Chinese cuisine includes some roasted (shao k’ao), grilled (chien),or fried (cha) dishes, not combined with vegetables, but they are the exception.

Consequently, Chinese dishes require less meat. A small piece, say half a pound, enough for only one person if cooked the Western way, may serve five persons if cooked in the Chinese way. An excellent example is the well known dish chop suey, which, although invented by Chinese in America rather than in China itself, utilizes the principles of ch’ao, a staple method of the Chinese cuisine.

Ch’ao, pronounced and often spelled “chow,” means low-oil, quick-stir frying. Both meat and vegetables are cut into small pieces and cooked over high heat in a . wok, a large concave skillet. Lacking a wok, the American cook can achieve the same effect in a cast-iron frying pan. A small amount of oil is used, but practically no water. The method is almost unknown to the West, which is surprising because it is so simple and quick and adds flavor to everything cooked. It is suitable for cooking either meat with vegetables or vegetables alone, in almost endless variety.

Priscilla is a cooking lover has been teaching in food industry almost 15 years. She has involed teaching in Chinese Cooking, Japanese food, Thailand food, Estern Cuisine, Indian Food, Hawaiian Style, Philippines Style, Oriental Food, Asian Cuisine, Western Style, Meals in Minutes and etc. She would like to share with people a broad knowledge of and keen pleasure in the good healthy life style of good eating through her many years of experience.

Principles of a Chinese Gourmet

An introduction to the fine art and science of creating perfection out of simple ingredients.

Among devotees of gastronomy who have had the privilege, of sampling the great national cuisines of the world, the Chinese cuisine is rated No. 1 quite as often as the French. It has a purity and refinement that transcend mere cleverness, a beautiful simplicity that marks the truly gourmet. Like the French, it is based upon sensitivity to the inherent nature of the foodstuff being prepared. Chinese awareness and respect for intrinsic taste and texture have produced a highly sophisticated body of practices and seasoning.

There are cookery books that provide recipes for Chinese food. But recipes are dry reading at best. As cookery is an art, one can hardly learn much from recipes without an explanation of the principles that underlie the cuisine that created them. The principles of Chinese cooking have been developed partly from long experience and partly by accident through many centuries. They are applicable not only to Chinese food but to good cooking in general, a science as well as an art.

First, the Chinese believe in nature. According to their interpretation, everything that grows on earth and is edible can be delicious when properly prepared, and so is intended by nature to be eaten by man. The Chinese explored the kingdom of vegetables and herbs and living creatures and so discovered a number of foods, undreamed of by the Westerner, that are both appetizing and beneficial to health. They are used when freshly gathered from field or forest or sea, and again after they have been preserved by pickling or drying in the sun. Thanks to these means of preservation, their supply is assured for all seasons.

As an example, the Chinese discovered the virtues of the soybean, and methods of growing bean sprouts indoors and making bean curds throughout the year.These ingredients are truly a blessing to the Chinese and a just reward for a long, patient search. They are appetizing, nutritious, and because economical to produce, accessible to all. When properly prepared, they appeal equally to the palate of prince or peasant. Such widespread appeal is typical of Chinese cooking.

Most Chinese dishes include some vegetables. The net effect is to enhance the taste of the main ingredient (meat or seafood) and at the same time give simple vegetables the benefit of pleasing flavor from the meat. The combination makes a delicious dish, easy to digest and healthful. Of course, Western cuisines use vegetables, too, but they are generally cooked and eaten separately from the meat. The Chinese cuisine includes some roasted (shao k’ao), grilled (chien),or fried (cha) dishes, not combined with vegetables, but they are the exception.

Consequently, Chinese dishes require less meat. A small piece, say half a pound, enough for only one person if cooked the Western way, may serve five persons if cooked in the Chinese way. An excellent example is the well known dish chop suey, which, although invented by Chinese in America rather than in China itself, utilizes the principles of ch’ao, a staple method of the Chinese cuisine.

Ch’ao, pronounced and often spelled “chow,” means low-oil, quick-stir frying. Both meat and vegetables are cut into small pieces and cooked over high heat in a . wok, a large concave skillet. Lacking a wok, the American cook can achieve the same effect in a cast-iron frying pan. A small amount of oil is used, but practically no water. The method is almost unknown to the West, which is surprising because it is so simple and quick and adds flavor to everything cooked. It is suitable for cooking either meat with vegetables or vegetables alone, in almost endless variety.

Priscilla is a cooking lover has been teaching in food industry almost 15 years. She has involed teaching in Chinese Cooking, Japanese food, Thailand food, Estern Cuisine, Indian Food, Hawaiian Style, Philippines Style, Oriental Food, Asian Cuisine, Western Style, Meals in Minutes and etc. She would like to share with people a broad knowledge of and keen pleasure in the good healthy life style of good eating through her many years of experience.

Szechuan Gourmet – NYC Order Chinese Food Online at Szechaun Gourmet 2 New York City Locations

Looking for delicious Chinese Food to order online or for takeout? Try Szechuan Gourmet NYC. Enjoy creative Chinese delivery food from either of Szechuan Gourmet’s two locations. Visit the menus on SeamlessWeb and order online today! Eat delectable Chinese food at our restaurant of from the comfort of your own home. We deliver to businesses also!

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