Tag Archives: CLASSIC

Chile Powder Makes Many Texas Foods Classic

Traditional Texas cooking requires a broad range of seasonings, sauces, and spices. Many of these flavoring agents have drifted away from their early roots and have begun to spice liven up other cooking styles. You will find a large variation in blends of seasonings within Texas food today. This is producing dishes with bold, assertive flavors that are finding their way into other parts of the country.

Chile, with an “e”, is meant here when talking about peppers and pepper spices, not as the famous Texas bowl of red called chili (with an “i”). Chili cooking and recipes will be well-represented throughout the Food In Texas website, but here we will be talking about spices and seasonings.

The chile pepper was introduced to Texans by Spanish and Mexican settlers over 150 years ago. This sometimes hot, sometimes not fruit finds its way into almost every Texas recipe there is. Today, there is about 120 varieties of chiles grown in the state. They can be found fresh, pickled, smoked, frozen, dried, and canned.

Most of the dried chiles used in are found in the form of chile powder. This is a mixture of one or more kinds of dried chiles, combined with cumin and other dried spices. When using the store-bought powder at home, find brands that contain less or no salt, as well as a sweet taste. A quality chile powder should be warm to the taste but not burn your mouth. Chile powder should not be confused with chili mixes, which contain onions, garlic, thickeners,and other ingredients.

Many Texas recipes call for a ground dried red chile. This chile powder comes mostly from two chile peppers, the New Mexico chile, and the Ancho pepper, which has a chocolate, sweet taste. The New Mexico chile, called the “long red” by some, is hotter and a deeper red color than you will find in most packaged chile powders. This deep red color produces a chile powder that is the purest there is.

When at all possible, grind your own chile powder. It has deeper, more intense flavors than you will find in any packaged chile powder. To grind your own chile powder takes hardly any effort or time, but it is well-worth it. Remove all stems and seeds from the peppers, toast in the oven at 300 degrees Fahrenheit until slightly crisp, break into pieces, then grind in a blender or spice grinder.

A couple of other chiles include passillas and mulatos, which are similar in heat, but with slightly different flavors. These can be grinded and blended to make your own special chile powder mixes, if you choose.

There are also quite a few other hotter chiles that can be used to make great chile powders in the same dried red form. These include the the tiny chiltepins or chile pequins, which grow wild in the southern part of Texas. Chile de arbol and cayenne, two other red chile cousins, also provide an intense heat. Chile de arbol ads more of a Mexican flavor, and the cayenne is normally associated with cajun food.

A milder variety of red chile available to make chile powder is the paprika. It usually comes already powdered, and provides a sweeter, less intense flavor. Some varieties of ground paprika provide almost no heat, and these should be avoided if wanting to add significant flavor to your dishes.

If purchasing packaged chile powders, only buy what you think you will use in the near future. The flavors of these powders lose their intensity in a very short time, so be prepared to change out your chile powder when it gets old.

Billy Bristol is the writer and editor for Food in Texas, a website devoted to the celebration of tradition homemade Texas Food. With simple recipes and cooking ideas that bring out the best in classic Texas cuisine, Food in Texas is creating its own culinary legacy.

Europe’s Classic Romantic Inns The Azores

Europe's Classic Romantic Inns The Azores

TERRA NOSTRA GARDEN HOTELLocated on the island of San Miguel, the resort hotel is built in the crater of an extinct volcano. The particular micro-climate has fostered a lush garden filled with rare species of plants, and thermal springs feed its giant pool. We tour the extensive gardens with the young owner, Luis Bensaude, and eat �cozido,� a special dish that is cooked by burying pots in thermally heated ground.QUINTA DA NASCE D�AGUAThis lovely manor house on the island of Terceira was converted into an inn a couple years ago and is now the favorite of discerning visitors. Our hostess, Dona Ana Maria, supervises an exceptional restaurant. We visit the site of the Battle of Salga, where the islanders repelled a Spanish invasion by driving wild cattle into their ranks.ESTALAGEM DE SANTA CRUZThe fort of Santa Cruz was built in 1567 for protection against pirates. It overlooks the port of Horta on the island of Faial, the crossroads of the Spanish Empire galleon fleet. Our hosts are three local men who take us to Peter�s Cafe, the famous meeting place and message center for sailors, which has an outstanding scrimshaw museum. Regional Highlights:Whale Watching- Island of Pico Azores was the whaling center of the Atlantic during the last two centuries. Whaling was outlawed ten years ago, but the cry of �Baleias!� – �Whales� – still sends out little boats to track the huge cetaceans. Only now the boats are filled with eco-tourists, who thrill to being so close to whales
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PART 1 of 6 – The Dog House (JV & Elvis) Wild 94.9, Ray Luv, Gary Archer, BAY CLASSIC 1/21/05

www.pushinthebay.com – PART 1 of 6 – Another PTBTV Pushin’ The Bay TV Bay Area classic – The Dog House (JV & Elvis) on Wild 94.9 featuring Ray Luv, Gary Archer, and local Bay Area talent on 1/21/05. The Dog House was an American radio talk show co-hosted by JV (Jeff Vandergrift) and Elvis (Dan Lay). The show was most recently based in New York City on 92.3 Free FM, and previously aired on ClearChannel’s Wild 94.9 in the San Francisco Bay Area. The New York show was canceled in May 2007, due to a controversy over a segment that it aired involving a prank call to a Chinese restaurant. The co-hosts and the producer were subsequently fired by the station and CBS Radio. In March 2008, they began broadcasting a new show via the web. The Dog House stars JV and Elvis. The two met in 1993 and have been radio cohosts together for over 15 years, (along with JV’s high school friend and show producer “Hollywood” Lance Otani) starting on Hot 97.7 in San Jose, California. In 1995, program directors Michael Martin and Joe Cunningham of Wild 107 eagerly hired them to fill a timeslot vacated by Mancow Muller. The Dog House quickly became a household name after joining Wild 107.7 (which subsequently moved to Wild 94.9), as they became the #1 rated morning show in the Bay Area receiving higher ratings than Howard Stern; only to be terminated several years later due to off-air controversy. Shortly after being fired from Wild 94.9, they helped launch KIFR at the end of 2005 before moving to